Anatomy of a Pitch

Anatomy of a Pitch. By Gavin McMahon of Make a Power(ful) Point

What do you need to add to your presentation? After you have evaluated your audience, part of your plan is the sequence and topics you are presenting. Consider how homogenous or diverse your audience is, how much time they have and who they are comparing your solution to.

I recommend reading the Anatomy of a Pitch by Gavin McMahon of Make a Power(ful) Point. Here are some of the take-away’s and commentary I have to share from Gavin’s article. (Gavin thank you for the thoughtful and enlightening recommendations!)

Shauna McGee Kinney, Copywriter Summary and review by Shauna McGee Kinney

The Solution

Box on the head - anatomy of a pitch
© ra2 studio – Fotolia.com

… Consider how homogenous or diverse your audience is, how much time they have and who they are comparing your solution to. …

Oh, did I mention solution? Don’t focus on the product!

Define who your product or service is meant for and what problem it solves. For example,

‘ We service companies of 500 to 5000 employees with benefits consulting. We help employers evaluate and select benefits products. We monitor benefits for cost, savings and positive returns. We partner with your benefits manager to service your future, existing and past employees. ‘

Think about the points of fascination, the complaints or comments most often communicated by your ideal clients. Pitch to their needs and give enough detail that they recognise your solution.

The Action

Add a call to action ahead of your pitch and behind your pitch.

Strategise the pitch first then craft the calls to action around the pitch. For example, before the topic above, you might ask a rhetorical question. Rhetorical questions can be less intimidating when pitching to a large audience.

‘ Are you frustrated and confused by complex employee benefits products and complicated government legislation binding employers? ‘

Close with a more direct call to action, such as,

‘ We’re here to help. Call or email us.’

There are more ideas for types of pitches by fascination point; or pitching workflow or procedures to fellow employees; or promoting your solution through training-narration-role playing. See below.

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